Album Review: Dearly Beloved’s Enduro

Enduro

It’ll Burrow, It’ll Shake You Down

Dearly Beloved_Enduro

 

Most of us are guilty of yearning for the rockstar life at one point or another. But what does it mean to make music your life? We tend to ignore what being saddled with artistic drive is actually like, to use creative output as a salve for inner turmoil. Toronto’s Dearly Beloved know this existence well; forever putting pens to paper and mouths to mics, trying to reach some indeterminate place of peace. Having found inspiration in the desert during the production of 2012’s Hawk vs Pigeon, the band returned to Dave Catching’s Rancho de la Luna in Joshua Tree, California to see if lightning would strike twice. It did—resulting in the release their fifth album, Enduro.
 

At first blush, the title hints at the notion of enduring, something with which frontman Rob Higgins is familiar. Having formed the band as a way to deal with the death of his father, and his own medical tribulations, Higgins’ music reflects a “one foot in front of the other” approach to life crises and daily melancholies. A dreamer, he harbours a passion for escape—a desire to flee to places unknown with little else than a motorcycle. (Enduro also happens to be brand of motorbike). Needless to say, his band is one that lives for life on tour.
 

True to both interpretations of its name, Enduro is emotional and adrenaline-fueled. A brain-scrambling, teeth-chattering, bone-shaking off-road trip, it leaves the heart thumping and lungs begging for air. The album takes off like a shot, accelerating wildly through the opener ‘Enduro’, turning into a veritable freight train on ‘Olympics of No Regard‘, and mimicking the whine of a motorbike engine on ‘Seven Plagues’. Finally—eight tracks in—we’re given a chance to slow down and catch our breath on ‘All Sins Are Forgiven’. Appropriately, each song was road-tested, played loud while speeding over sandy plains. If it didn’t feel right in that environment, it didn’t make the cut.
 

What’s most striking about this album is its unapologetic sense of being made by a band that knows who they are and what they do well. Age, and a few trips around the proverbial block have left them without the wannabe rockstar air that plagues so many newer bands. Higgins and co-vocalist Niva Chow helm the project, which features a revolving door of drummers and guitarists. This isn’t so much indicative of the ol’ “creative differences” plea, than it is of Dearly Beloved being a collaborative of talented friends—some of which happen to be Canadian music heavyweights. Brendan Canning returns on this album to contribute his guitar talent on ‘Between Finger and Thumb’, while the “godfather of desert rock” Chris Goss tears it up on ‘Enduro‘, and punk rocker Eamon McGrath peppers his vocal, guitar, and writing skills throughout.
 

While many of the lyrics seem slightly pissed off, they are in equal parts evidence of healing. The repeated “do whatever it takes” (‘The Guile of Pricks’) and “you’re getting better every day, and you’re not out of your mind” (‘Enduro’) shine light at the end of the dark tunnel. A cunning wordsmith, Higgins has the genius capability of being simultaneously specific and vague. Songs that sound like they’re about a girl have an equal probability of being inspired by European history. He also somehow manages to sneak in highbrow words like ‘egregious’ without sounding like a total douche.
 

Rife with signature bass note roller coasters, guttural screams, and dreamy psychedelic guitars, Enduro expertly links Dearly Beloved’s past work with their current sound. Building on her growing vocal presence from album to album, Chow not only provides the ultra-femme melodies, but shouts and growls along with the boys, too, even finding herself in a fantasic vocal tug of war with both McGrath and Higgins on ‘Seven Plagues’.
 

After a mere 30 minutes, the road trip comes to a screeching halt. Breathless, invigorated, we’re left wanting more. Not due to dissatisfaction, but from being given a taste of life, freedom, and things to come.

 

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About J2

What happens when you're a wordsy music aficionado who works for NXNE, CMW, HPX, Olio Music Festival, The JUNOs and Polaris Music Prize? You spend all of your free time blogging about it... Follow on Twitter if you're so inclined: @HearPlugged

Posted on January 22, 2015, in Album Reviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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